Painting a Boat

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Johnny
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Location: Central FLORIDA - The Sunshine State -

Painting a Boat

Post by Johnny »

Disclaimer: I have been a professional painter and artisan since 1967.
Painting anything from a U.S. Navy Destroyer to a small Matchbox car.
Started out just whittling with a pocket knife, developing and honing my skills as I gained experience.
21 years in the U.S. Navy exposed me to many different aspects of fabrication, preservation and painting.
After the Navy, I worked for Lockheed-Martin Aerospace for 7 years as a custom woodworker and metal fabricator.
I started carving and painting signs as a hobby probably back in the late '60s. Again, learning on my own.
in 1987, I stumbled upon a "sign makers course" in Columbia, SC for a weekend symposium, $400.
wow - that set me on fire !! Learning from the "experts" all about paints and techniques.
in 1989, I attended a 5 day course of "handcrafting dimensional signs". $1800. What materials to use,
and again, preparation, priming and painting to achieve long lasting results.
Over the years, my skills developed exponentially. Working in many mediums, it just came natural.
After Lockheed Martin, I opened my own Custom Sign Shop in St. Marys, GA and ran it for over 20 years.
My skills in painting and carving developed to the point that I was sought out to teach others. So, in time,
I became an instructor as an artisan, traveling around the United States giving the same weekend workshops
that I had learned from. As a sign painter, we learn many "unorthodox" methods of applying paints and
coatings to a number of substrates. Metal, wood, plastic, etc.
Such as, on a hot sunny day, and you have to letter a truck outside in the sun, add a few drops of kerosene
to your paint. Kerosene does not evaporate, thus giving you some "slip" to your brush. Too much kerosene
(or any additive) and the paint will NEVER dry. This only comes from experience and education.

okay, now to the subject of HOW TO PAINT YOUR BOAT

Since being a member of Tin Boats, I see so many people trying to paint their boat as if it were a Rolls Royce
that will always be on display in the Smithsonian. I grit my teeth so many times to keep myself from yelling
IT IS ONLY A BOAT !!! Paint it and GO FISHING !!! But, this comes from my many years of paint it, get it done
and get it out the door. But, I do remember my first boat...... and I did make it nice and pretty. So I do understand
the mindset of first time boaters asking the mundane questions of "how do I paint my boat"......
It boils down to this . . .

Paint manufacturers have spent years and millions of dollars perfecting their product. So, my suggestion is simple:
FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS on the can, and you can't go wrong. When it comes to metal primers,
that also is another whole different world. There are some paints that are toxic to self etching primers.
Mostly, in the automotive paints..... So if you just stick with the K.I.S. (keep it simple) you will have good results.
Each and every sign painter I know, has their own way of doing things and their own formulas for paints to suit
their particular applications. There is no “right answer” to every situation. As there will be different ways to
paint anything from New York to Oregon to Florida.

The following photos are some of the projects that I have done over the years. Some are just painted wood,
plastic, cast metal, etc ….. But, all were painted with a BRUSH. Using basically the same “painting process” .
When a sign painter paints something, it is usually meant to last several years before it needs a repaint.
So proper surface preparation is essential to a good looking finish coat. Your boat included.
Remove any loose or flaking paint. Remove all oils and contaminants. Scuff/sand any smooth glossy areas
of paint that is sound and not flaking for good adhesion.
Apply a primer of your choice. Apply a topcoat of your choice. and GO BOATING !!!

Painting and fabricating things is my HOBBY !! I like tinkering, restoring, auto body work, painting houses,
home renovations, but, BOATING and anything to do with boating is my passion.
Have FUN - be SAFE
Attachments
This 1959 Crestliner has about 4 coats of paint on it. No primers.  <br />Just scuff and paint between coats of RustOleum gloss enamels.  <br />There are small chips here and there but for general fun boating, it is not an issue.
This 1959 Crestliner has about 4 coats of paint on it. No primers.
Just scuff and paint between coats of RustOleum gloss enamels.
There are small chips here and there but for general fun boating, it is not an issue.
Dental Sign - 1.jpg
Monument6.JPG
Sign Painter.jpg
HDU sign-06.jpg
HDU sign-06.jpg (98.45 KiB) Viewed 2493 times
HDU sign-05.jpg
HDU sign-04.jpg
HDU sign-04.jpg (110.98 KiB) Viewed 2493 times
USCG Training Center.jpg
https://www.tinboats.net/how-to-build-a-transom/
https://www.tinboats.net/varnish-vs-polyurethane/
All about Primers = https://www.tinboats.net/primer-and-paint-basics/
Paint, Thinners and Applications = https://www.paintingforpainters.com/

1959 Crestliner Commodore 14'
1959 Lone Star Malibu 14'
1958 Johnson 35 RDE-19 Sea Horse
1958 Johnson 35 RDS-20 Super Sea Horse

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fool4fish1226
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Location: South Florida

Painting a Boat

Post by fool4fish1226 »

Some really nice work Johnny :beer:
Work: A dangerous disorder affecting high public functionaries who want to go fishing

Project "A Little Snookered" https://www.tinboats.net/forum/viewtopic ... 21&t=22132

safetyfast
Posts: 89
Joined: 05 Feb 2015, 16:33
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Location: Upper East TN

Painting a Boat

Post by safetyfast »

Very nice work. Thanks

Kris
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Joined: 16 May 2015, 22:05
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Painting a Boat

Post by Kris »

Nice work there John. I noticed the unit crest for my Vietnam unit in there, the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. Allons.

BTW, I have redone a couple of boats and always use the same type paint, oil based enamel. I also use an additive from Petit Paints called Petitrol. Additional oils that you can watch the brush strokes lay out to a flat surface. Great stuff. I once had a wood boat, 67 Grady White Sportfisherman, that I redid that many people thought was fiberglass.
Work is for people who don't know how to fish!

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DaleH
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Location: Eastern Mass

Painting a Boat

Post by DaleH »

NICE signs there Johnny! Love the shield-types one in relief. You are a true artist.

And THANK YOU for your service!
#1) 1st tin rebuild, 18' Lund https://forum.tinboats.net/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=36583
#2) 25' Parker refurb from EMPTY hull https://www.classicparker.com/phpBB3/vie ... p?f=15&t=6
#3) 16' V-tin rebuild https://forum.tinboats.net/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=36465
#4 Procraft SV14
#5) 16' Starcraft entirely NEW Transom Skins https://forum.tinboats.net/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=37548

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Johnny
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Location: Central FLORIDA - The Sunshine State -

Painting a Boat

Post by Johnny »

Thanks guys !! I also belong to another salt water fishing forum https://www.pierandsurf.com
and there are a few guys that fish at the USCG training center and I asked him to
check out the USCG Yorktown sign. It has been in place for 15 years and he said it looks
to be in very good condition and recently freshly repainted.
Most of my later signs are High Density Urethane (HDU) that is a very workable medium
designed for hand carving and sculpting. Once primed and painted, it is absolutely the
best exterior sign material on the market. It has replaced redwood and cedar in many, many
sign shops. Not cheap !! But, delivers a very stable and weather proof product to the customer.
The ALLONS sign was one of my favorites of all times. I received many compliments and
the Commanding General that had it ordered called me personally on the phone to share
his enthusiasm with me. He stated that when he retires, that sign will go WITH him to his
home and the base can just order another one LOL LOL. That sign cost around $2400.00.
it is all hand carved HDU with the exception of the ribbon which is 4" wide PVC sheet that is
1/8" thick and about 4 or 5 feet long. I heated it with a heat gun to bend it into the ribbon shape
and the letters A L L O N S are of the same material, cut out with and X-Acto knife and glued
to the ribbon. Airbrushed for the additional dimensional effect.
The AFNSEP for the US Air Force. Some kind of National Security Program or something.
I forget. That is also all hand carved HDU. Behind the carved eagle head is blue cobalt crushed
glass applied to a cobalt blue paint/adhesive mix that we make ourselves. on the right behind the
lightening bolt is crushed black glass. Also applied to a midnight black paint/adhesive mix.
The crushed glass is called SMALTZ which really pops with the razzle dazzle effect in the sunlight.
The lightning bolt is 24k gold leaf and really pops. The ribbon is 18k gold leaf with airbrush tinting
for the additional dimensional effect. After I had gained notoriety within the Sign Makers World,
I would travel around the U.S. giving seminars on how to work with HDU as it was a new medium
in the art world and not many people were ready to jump from redwood and cedar to a plastic product without some kind of training in it first. Each seminar had about 50-150 attendees.
Some of the repetitive signs, such as for the Park Service,
I would make a rubber mold and mass produce them using the same 24 pound density liquid HDU.
With the development of my website, I did very little local work to focus on the National and International business sector.
Shipping my handcrafted dimensional signs all over the world.


Thanks for looking !!!!
LOL - so, if i can paint a sign and some old antique cars, surely to Goodness I can paint a BOAT LOL.
https://www.tinboats.net/how-to-build-a-transom/
https://www.tinboats.net/varnish-vs-polyurethane/
All about Primers = https://www.tinboats.net/primer-and-paint-basics/
Paint, Thinners and Applications = https://www.paintingforpainters.com/

1959 Crestliner Commodore 14'
1959 Lone Star Malibu 14'
1958 Johnson 35 RDE-19 Sea Horse
1958 Johnson 35 RDS-20 Super Sea Horse

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